All posts tagged: Gig Mindset

The Emergence of the Gig Mindset

People Movements Bring Change. The Gig Mindset Is No Exception.

First, people brought social to the workplace

This happened with social networks, which entered organizations timidly over a decade ago, were upsetting to many senior managers, but have now become widespread: approximately 60% of organizations have a single network worldwide, and another 25% have multiple networks.

Then people led and won the BYOD debate.

BYOD is another example. Bring Your Own Device was frowned on, even forbidden, in most companies. People did it anyway. Why? Because they had no choice. They needed mobile to do their jobs. Today well over half of organizations officially allow it for work purposes. And most of the others accept it. Companies with the most successful customer-facing workforce also have the highest rate of BYOD.

I wrote about this in 2016: Tracking the Trends in Bringing Our Own Devices to Work in the Harvard Business Review. Exceptions occur of course in highly regulated industries or on sites with highly classified data.

Now the gig mindset is the new battle ground.

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Navigating the Gig Mindset Paradox

My research has identified 8 behaviors that characterize traditional and gig mindsets.   If you scan the list of traditional behaviors, the left column on the chart, you’ll see that most organizations strongly enforce this way of doing things. Processes, roles and management practices are aligned to the traditional way of working. Gig mindset behaviors, the right column, are rarely encouraged, and sometimes even sanctioned. The paradox we are facing is that organizations need both mindsets. (more…)

Older Workers Lean Towards a Gig Mindset

Figure 4 for “How a Gig Mindset Inside Organizations Will Shape Our Future”, published on LinkedIn and as part of a series of posts for the 10th Global Peter Drucker Forum blog.

The survey data show that older workers are more likely to have a gig mindset approach to work whereas the younger age groups self-assessed at the lowest level in the survey population. Unsurprisingly, the younger workers rate themselves significantly lower on behavior 4: assuming responsibility outside of hierarchical systems.