All posts filed under: Gig Mindset

Research Participants

A solid reference core of organizations

Approximately 300 organizations participate each year in the Digital Age surveys.  They are located around the world, operate in a wide range of sectors, and include some of the world’s largest companies along with small organizations, NGOs and other non-corporate organization such as government agencies. The data here comes from the 10th survey in 2016, and is representative of the previous 4 or 5 years. (more…)

Beyond the CV

Deciding who to hire is not easy. Especially now that people are beginning to realise that traditional skills and knowledge are not necessarily the most important criteria today. Times are uncertain and organizations need people who are comfortable in ambiguous, complex situations where the “right thing to do” is not obvious. (more…)

Staying Ahead of the Curve

The shape of organizations in the future will depend in large part on how we as individuals take control, steer our own lives and interact and communicate with others in the workplace. People and organizations who want to stay ahead of the curve need to develop a gig mindset work culture.  (more…)

The Emergence of the Gig Mindset – The Long Story

The term “gig mindset” refers to the attitudes and behaviors of people who, even though they are salaried employees in an organization, approach their work as if they were independent freelancers. Their attitudes and behaviors contrast with those of salaried people who work with what we might call the “traditional mindset”, with an approach to work influenced by defined roles, hierarchy and established procedures. (more…)

The Survey

 

  • “The survey from Jane McConnell on changing attitudes to work and the “gig mindset” is the best 15 mins you’ll spend on the Internet.”
  • “Thank you for this survey and letting me be aware of the gig mindset. New perspective to think about organizational culture.”

(more…)

The Gig Mindset Inside the Organization

The term “gig mindset” refers to the attitudes and behaviors of people who, even though they are salaried employees in an organization, approach their work as if they were independent freelancers. Their attitudes and behaviors contrast with those of salaried people who work with what we might call the “traditional mindset”, with an approach to work influenced by defined roles, hierarchy and established procedures.

My Wakeup Call

Since 1998, I have advised organizations on strategies and actions steps for their internal digital work environments. I was always fascinated (and discouraged!) by how long it took to move things forward. In most cases, we made progress, the client and myself, but it was usually hard going. Yet, in nearly every organization I worked with, there was at least one person, sometimes a few more, with whom I felt a shared passion to shake things up, to open eyes and minds to new possibilities. gradually I realized that these rare people saw their jobs much as I, the external freelancer, saw mine. I coined the term gig mindset to describe these people.

I decided to look closer. How did it compare to a traditional mindset? Is it risky? Is it an opportunity? How does it impact people and organizations?  The outcome of this research is a book that will be published early 2021.

Even before starting my research, it was clear to me that organizations did not welcome the gig mindset, and often actively resisted it. I talked about the gig mindset  at a conference a couple years ago and one of the first people to come up to me afterwards said:

“You’re the first person to understand how I feel at work. Sometimes I’m so discouraged I think I should quit.”

 

In contrast to this, a senior director asked me this question:

“How can I get this inside my organization?”

 

On one hand we have a discouraged gig mindsetter and on the other a senior director who wants to cultivate a gig mindset work culture.

How can we bring the discouraged gidmindsetter and the open-minded senior director together? That is one of the objectives of my research, the articles published here and my upcoming book about the gig mindset inside organizations.

Read in more detail.

Being Resilient

This article is about being resilient. It is not about resilience. A resilient person or organization can get through a crisis. But making it through once is not enough. It is highly likely there will be more and greater disruption in the short- and long-term. We are already living this. Being resilient is a state of readiness, a way of acting, a way of thinking. It is proactive, not reactive. In today’s work environment, this is business critical, for individuals and for organizations. It may even be a question of survival. (more…)

Civil Disobedience Facing Strategic Blindness (1/2)

CONTEXT: Focus here on Civil Disobedience.

The opposing forces of what I’m calling civil disobedience and strategic blindness underlie the gig mindset inside the organization. They are the fundamental forces that will make or break the gig-mindset way of working inside companies and are the subject of an early chapter in my upcoming book. This article about civil disobedience is part one of a short series. (more…)

Civil Disobedience Facing Strategic Blindness (2/2)

CONTEXT: Focus here on Strategic Blindness.

The opposing forces of what I’m calling civil disobedience and strategic blindness underlie the gig mindset inside the organization. They are the fundamental forces that will make or break the gig-mindset way of working inside companies and are the subject of an early chapter in my upcoming book. This article about strategic blindness is part two of a short series. (more…)