Author: Jane McConnell

People, work cultures and leadership are out of synch

The point of this short article is to show data over past years that provide a context for understanding the emergence of the gig mindset: High people capabilities (top left chart) in stifling work cultures (bottom right) with rigid management practices (top right) have led to new behaviors for people who are self-motivated to make a difference in their organization.

Read More

Navigating the Gig Mindset Paradox

My research has identified 8 behaviors that characterize traditional and gig mindsets.   If you scan the list of traditional behaviors, the left column on the chart, you’ll see that most organizations strongly enforce this way of doing things. Processes, roles and management practices are aligned to the traditional way of working. Gig mindset behaviors, the right column, are rarely encouraged, and sometimes even sanctioned. The paradox we are facing is that organizations need both mindsets.

Read More

Older Workers Lean Towards a Gig Mindset

Figure 4 for “How a Gig Mindset Inside Organizations Will Shape Our Future”, published on LinkedIn and as part of a series of posts for the 10th Global Peter Drucker Forum blog. The survey data show that older workers are more likely to have a gig mindset approach to work whereas the younger age groups self-assessed at the lowest level in the survey population. Unsurprisingly, the younger workers rate themselves significantly lower on behavior 4: assuming responsibility outside of hierarchical systems.

Read More